My Endo Story

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I’ve had so much resistance to sharing my personal endo story publicly. Yes, it feels vulnerable and raw. But mostly, it feels sort of self-indulgent. I mean, I feel my story is not really all that interesting, and it’s definitely not unique! However, I do have a sense of personal responsibility to share my experiences. Keeping endo shrouded in shadows and secrecy only allows us, and so many other women, to continue suffering in silence. If we begin talking about having endo as openly as we would talk about having a broken leg or the flu, then we will immediately feel less alone and perhaps one day soon we will have better treatment options or even a cure.

So, here goes… Read More


You Are Loveable, Even If You Are Sick

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Note to self (and anyone else who needs to hear it)…

You are loveable, even if you are sick.

You are worthy, even if you cannot give as much as you receive.

You are kind, even if you say “no” more than you say “yes”.

You are loving, even if you have to cancel plans to stay in bed.

You are smart, even if your brain feels foggy and forgetful. Read More


Inspiring Sources of Endo Info

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I read recently that endometriosis is as common as diabetes or asthma. I don’t know about you, but I learned about diabetes and asthma in primary school. Right around the time I learned about periods. Yet like most people, I had never even heard of endometriosis. That is, until I began researching my own mystery symptoms and started to suspect that I might actually have it. Whatever the heck it was. And if you’re anything like me, once you are diagnosed, things only become more confusing. No one knows the cause. No one knows the cure. No two endo situations are alike, but the prognosis generally seems pretty negative. So what’s a girl to do when information overwhelm sets in and it feels like there’s not a single clear answer to be found? Read More


My Plan to Heal Endo Naturally

IMG_2596Once you are on the other side of laparoscopic surgery (or perhaps even before then), two things quickly become apparent: 1) endo usually grows back 2) there is no conclusive, scientifically proven way to stop it. Most doctors recommend immediately going on (or continuing) hormonal birth control to attempt to suppress the endo from growing back too rapidly. From what I can gather after a tonne of research and talking to a lot of women, with endo there are no guarantees, with or without birth control. Personally, I have not had positive experiences on birth control (from endless bleeding to constant vomiting to depression). So after a lot of research and a lot of soul searching, I made the decision not to take it. No judgement for anyone that chooses that path, it just isn’t right for me – at least not right now. However, I knew if I wasn’t going down that path, I had to take other big actions, so I have committed myself to a natural alternative protocol. Read More


An Invisible Illness

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“Endo, what?”

Before we begin, if you have never heard of endometriosis before (and don’t worry, most people haven’t), you can check out an explanation here.

If you’re suffering from endometriosis (or any chronic illness), I’m so sorry you’re going through this. Please know, you are not alone. I know how it feels when endo takes away your energy, your vitality, your motivation, your physical freedom and completely dulls your sparkle.  Read More